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Eastern Bloc Songs: Party, Pop & Politics (Centrala, September 2018)

4 Jul

Helena Majdaniec (Film Spiegel, 1964)

To coincide with the 50th anniversary of the Prague Spring in Czechoslovakia during 1968, and in anticipation of next year’s 30-year anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall, Centrala is hosting Eastern Bloc Songs: Party, Pop & Politics, a display based on informal research by Wayne Burrows. The exhibition will feature a broad range of archive materials arranged to tell the story of the development of official popular music cultures in former Eastern Bloc Communist states, gathering EP and LP sleeve art, photographs, posters, ephemera, texts, TV footage and promotional films, all drawn from the back catalogues of state-run record labels in Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and other Eastern Bloc European states between c.1963 – 1988. The result is post-war pop music’s history refreshed and re-told from a perspective on the other side of its standard Anglo-American, English language looking-glass.

This exhibition and events programme will also be accompanied by a book-length illustrated publication bringing together around 65 translated song lyrics, mainly from Poland and Czechoslovakia, with short introductions to key artists and events, telling the story of popular music’s development in these countries during the Cold War years. Building additional context and background to complement the material in the gallery, Eastern Bloc Songs: Party, Pop & Politics will be launched at the exhibition in early September 2018. Sampling the stylistic range, political complexity and musical quality achieved by artists working under the frequently strained conditions prevailing within official cultures, Eastern Bloc Songs might also offer suggestive parallels for artists today, whose own working conditions have evolved in the years since 1989 (and at an accelerating rate since 2008’s financial market crash) into all-too familiar patterns of ideologically-driven diktat and bureaucratic micro-management.

Hana & Petr Ulrychovi poster

Eastern Bloc Songs: Party, Pop & Politics

Contents:

Introduction: Communist Rock’n’Roll: Party, Pop & Politics (1963 – 1988)

Filipinki: from Wala-Twist EP
(i) Wala-Twist
(ii) Batumi
Helena Majdaniec: Już raz było tak
Czerwone Gitary: Nie Zadzieraj Nosa
Vulkán & Hana Ulrychová: Sen
Niebiesko-Czarni: Nie Pukaj do Moich Drzwi
Sarolta Zalatnay & Metro Együttes: Mostanában Bármit Teszünk
Marta Kubišová: Two Songs
(i) Rezavý Svět
(ii) Lampa
Czesław Niemen: Dziwny jest ten świat
Prúdy: Čierna ruža
Synkopy 61: Válka je Vůl
Olympic: Psychiatrický Prášek
Karel Kahovec & Flamengo: Poprava Blond Holky
Atlantis & Hana a Petr Ulrychovi: Vůně
Hana Zagorová: Three Songs
(i) Svatej Kluk
(ii) Mrtvá Láska
(iii) Tisíc nových jmen
Illés: Nehéz az út
Olympic: from Pták Rosomák
(i) Báječné Místo
(ii) Pták Rosomák
(iii) Ikarus Blues
Marta Kubišová: from Songy a Balady
(i) Proudy
(ii) Kdo ti radu dá
(iii)Ring-o-Ding
(iv) Tak Dej Se K Nám a Projdem Svět
(v) Zlý dlouhý púst
(vi) Ne
(vii) Balada o kornetovi a dívce
(viii) Modlitba Pro Martu
Atlantis & Hana a Petr Ulrychovi: from Odyssea
(i) Odysseovo Ztroskotání
(ii) Ticho
(iii) Leží nade mnou kámen
(v) Za Vodou, Za Horou
Breakout: from Na drugim brzegu tęczy
(i) Poszłabym Za Tobą
(ii) Gdybyś kochał hej
Skaldowie: Two Songs
(i)Dojeżdżam
(ii) Malowany Dym
Alibabki: from Kwiat Jednej Nocy
(i) Słońce w Chmurach łazi
(ii) Kwiat Jednej Nocy
(iii) Grajmy Sobie w Zielone
Marta Kubišová: Tajga Blues ’69
Omega: Gyöngyhajú lány
Hana Zagorová: Two Songs
(i) Rokle
(ii) Verbíř
Urszula Sipinska: Trzymając Się Za Ręce
Czesław Niemen: from Enigmatic
(i) Bema pamięci żałobny-rapsod
(ii) Kwiaty Ojczyste
(iii) Jednego Serca
Klan: Automaty
Václav Neckář: Nautilus
Maryla Rodowicz: Żyj mój świecie
Hana a Petr Ulrychovi: Rozmarýn
Marek Grechuta & Anawa: Korowod
Vera Spinarová: Andromeda
Tadeusz Woźniak: Zegarmistrz Światła
Josipa Lisac: Ne Prepoznajem Ga
Halina Frąckowiak: Ide Dalej
Tadeusz Woźniak: from Odcień Ciszy
(i) Pewnego Dnia O Świcie
(ii) Odcień Ciszy
Izabela Trojanowska: Jestem Twoim Grzechem
Urszula: Wołam Znów Przez Sen
Manaam: Krakowski Spleen
Grupul Stereo: Plopii Impari
Kapitan Nemo: Wideonarkomania
Gayga & DiN: Chodzę, stoję, siedzę, leżę

Appendix I: Mapping the Territory of Star City (2010)
Appendix II: Out-Takes & Demos (2012)
Appendix III: A Note on the Translations (2014)

Discography

Gayga (Krystyna Stolarska)

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‘Behold! The Markets Shall Erase Our History!’ (Nottingham Contemporary documentation by Andy Keate, 2016)

5 May
Salome (1953)

Robert Holcombe: Salome (1953)

Вот! Свободный рынок ликвидирует нашу!, 1973, is a book of collages by Robert Holcombe, a fictional British artist. Presenting evidence from a range of hidden, fabricated and authentic Cold War histories, the exhibition documented here takes its overall title from this work. The specific copy of the book used has its provenance in the library of Sir Frederick William (‘Bill’) Deakin (1913 – 2005), a former literary adviser to Churchill and active British liason officer with the Partisans of Josip Broz Tito in Yugoslavia between May and December 1943. While the image captions of Behold! The Markets Shall Erase Our History! remain legible, allowing ghosts of the source material’s original purpose to show through, the historical content of the photographs themselves is cancelled by layers of advertising, technological and erotic imagery. The display, commissioned for the Small Collections Room at Nottingham Contemporary between January 16 and April 17 2016, was made in response to both Pablo Bronstein’s room design, featuring four antique cabinets, and themes suggested by Monuments Should Not Be Trusted, an exhibition of artworks and objects from Communist Yugoslavia curated by Lina Džuverović in the main galleries.

Cabinet 1: Works from the Robert Holcombe Archive

This cabinet presents a selection of works by Robert Holcombe (1923 – 2003). The display includes a selection from his series Krakow: pour Alina Szapocznikow, 1964, and The Holcombe Family Bible, 1967, alongside Study for Performing the Curtain Ritual, 1966, and the book work Вот! Свободный рынок ликвидирует нашу!. The cabinet also includes a number of undated photographic studies, such as Triceratops and Skegness Comet. Although undated, these studies were probably made at various times between 1951-63.

Cabinet 2: Works, Ephemera and Archive Materials

This cabinet includes source materials and other ephemera from the Holcombe archive alongside smaller works by Holcombe: Mask, c. 1952; The Lawn, 1966; and Argentina, 1976. A deck of Holcombe designed Tarot cards and their 1953 precursor, A Summary Of Contemporary Knowledge About Life And Its Possibilities, also feature. Archive materials include publications such as Youth in the GDR, scientific book club editions of The Drama of the Atom and LSD in Action, a set of 1940s film-star cigarette cards, a 1960 book of speculations by eminent Soviet Scientists on Life in the Twenty-First Century, and an eccentric hand-coloured photograph of a nuclear family.

Cabinet 3: 723 Variations on the Same Theme

The 723 found texts layered inside the drawers of this cabinet are cut from a wide range of consumer, technical and other publications from the 1940s to early 1980s. These cut outs are intended as both a typographic survey and an exploration of the everyday presence of propaganda in Western printed media during the Cold War period. They focus particularly on texts revealing prevailing insecurities and aspirations. The arbitrary number 723, which determines the size of the collection, was originally fixed by the addition to the series of a 1964 strap-line advertising a range of Hasselblad cameras.

Cabinet 4: Eastern Bloc Songs

This cabinet gathers a selection of 7” and 10” record sleeves produced between 1964 and 1981 by official state labels in Poland, Czechoslovakia and Hungary to give a brief visual introduction to the prolific and politically complex popular music cultures of European communist states during the Cold War period. The display is accompanied by a looped audio soundtrack featuring 11 songs by some of the artists featured, including Filipinki, Klan, Marta Kubišová, Czesław Niemen, Hana Zagorová, Sarolta Zalatnay, Olympic, Petr Ulrych, Josipa Lisac, Tadeusz Woźniak and Izabela Trojanowska. A small sampler publication introducing loose English translations of these 11 songs is also available.

Wall: Other Works by Robert Holcombe

Above Cabinet 1: Salome, 1953
Above Cabinet 2: Triptych (Marine Geology, The Sandstorm, The Brocken Spectre), 1955
Above Cabinets 3 & 4: The Modern Interior I & II, 1967

Behold! The Markets Shall Erase Our History! (Nottingham Contemporary, 16 Jan to 17 April 2016)

6 Jan

Eastern Bloc Songs Sampler

Behold! The Markets Shall Erase Our History! (Small Collections Room, Nottingham Contemporary, 16 Jan 2016 – 17 Apr 2016)

Drawing together strands from a number of ongoing projects, including 723 Variations On The Same Theme, Eastern Bloc Songs and the fictional archives of the British artist Robert Holcombe, Wayne Burrows presents a display spanning both sides of the Cold War. Curated by Irene Aristizábal, Behold! The Markets Shall Erase Our History! takes in typographic consumer propaganda, erased partisan histories, fabricated Independent Group artworks and artifacts from the histories of popular music in Communist Poland, Hungary and Czechoslovakia. Eastern Bloc Songs: A Sampler, introducing loose English translations from the Polish, Czech, Hungarian and Croatian lyrics of 11 songs featured in the exhibition – all recorded between 1964 and 1981 by Filipinki, Klan, Marta Kubišová, Czesław Niemen, Hana Zagorová, Sarolta Zalatnay, Olympic, Hana & Petr Ulrychovi, Josipa Lisac, Tadeusz Woźniak and Izabela Trojanowska – is published by Nottingham Contemporary to accompany and contextualise the display and will be available at the gallery shop and elsewhere from January 15th.

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Eastern Bloc Disco with UrBororo (Nottingham Contemporary, 16 Jan 2016, 8.30pm to 11pm, free).

To celebrate the opening weekend of Monuments Should Not Be Trusted and expand on the display of Eastern Bloc 7” records in his exhibition in the Small Collections Room, Wayne Burrows will be playing soul, rock, psychedelia, pop, folk and jazz, all drawn from the surprisingly diverse output of the official state record labels of Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, Yugoslavia, Bulgaria, Romania, East Germany and the USSR between the 1960s and early 1980s.

The session will also include a live set from UrBororo, Pil & Galia Kollectiv’s new venture into “skewed filing cabinet swamp blues for corporate inflight listening” – an “objectively boring” band whose songs are made from an unlikely merger between the sounds of surf, grunge and punk and whose lyrics are all borrowed from a 1970s Management Self-Help guide.

“UrBororo are objectively boring. They also view themselves as boring. UrBororo actually refer to themselves with typically irritating self-deprecation as ‘The People Who You Wouldn’t Like to be Cornered by at a Party’. They regard most of what they do as a waste of time. Based on a managerial help book, the songs they play propose a skewed filing cabinet swamp blues for corporate inflight listening.”Pil & Galia Kollectiv (2015)

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