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David Severn’s ‘Whitby Goth Weekend’ (Beam Editions, November 2018)

3 Nov

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For Halloween 2018, Nottingham based photographer David Severn launched a limited edition photobook of his series of images taken during Whitby Goth Weekend. Published by Nottingham independent art publishers Beam Editions, designed by Joff+Ollie with stitched binding and silk-screened cover (including a newly commissioned Whitby Abbey design by Becky Wood) and an introductory essay by Wayne Burrows, the book is a whimsical exploration of the Gothic seaside tradition.

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The essay explores the literary and political influences on Goth subculture and the history and character of Whitby itself, a town known as the formative location of both Bram Stoker’s Dracula and Polynesian explorer Captain James Cook’s early years: a point where the cultural geographies of Gothic and Exotica merge against a backdrop of amusement arcades, chip shops, maritime monuments and olde worlde shopfronts selling sticks of rock, Victorian style jet jewellery and carved ammonite ‘snake-stones’.

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A Gothic soirée to launch the publication took place in the Ottar Cafe-Bar at Nottingham Contemporary on Nov 1st, 2018. The playlist of records heard at the event are listed below, though not necessarily  in the exact order actually played as I lost track of the sequencing fairly early on in the night. Tracks were loosely chosen to trace some of the tributaries and streams running into, through and between Gothic and Exotica subcultures, before and after ‘Goth’ was ever named as such, as explored in the short essay introducing the book itself.

Paul Giovanni/Magnet: Maypole
Thomas Tallis: Spem in Alium
Black Sabbath: Black Sabbath
Sam Gopal: A Midsummer Night’s Dream
Arthur Brown: I Put A Spell On You
Satan’s Pilgrims: Haunted House of Rock
The Open Mind: Magic Potion
The Cult: Spiritwalker
Goat: Hide From The Sun
Wolf People: Ninth Night
Sisters of Mercy with Ofra Haza: Temple of Love
Astaroth: Satanspiritus
Bauhaus: The Man With the X-Ray Eyes
Fuzz Against Junk: Ballad of the Hip Death Goddess
Bulldog Breed: Austin Osman Spare
Siouxsie & The Banshees: Spellbound
Janie Jones: Witch in White
Kate Bush: Hammer Horror
The Cure: A Forest
Bauhaus: Bela Lugosi’s Dead
Malaria: Kaltes Klares Wasser
The Cramps: Aloha From Hell
The Ventures: The Bat
Witchknot: Baba Yaga
Toads: Morpheus
The Birthday Party: Release The Bats
Frog: Witch Hunt
Mr Fox: Mendle
Jefferson Airplane: White Rabbit
The Rattles: The Witch
The Creatures: Seven Tears
Tim Hollier: Message To A Harlequin
Baker Street Philharmonic: Ocean of Storms
Broadcast: Black Cat
Angelo Badalamenti: The Pink Room
Madonnatron: Mermaids
Essjay: Twins of Evil
Danielle Dax: Cat House
The Pandoras: Haunted Beach Party
Broadcast & The Focus Group: The Be Colony
April March: Sugar
Pram: Play of the Waves
Frank Hunter: Strange Echoes
Bas Sheva & Les Baxter: Lust
Martin Denny: Incense & Peppermints
Don Ralke: Black Panther
Dead Can Dance: The Summoning of the Muse
Sheila Chandra: Sacred Stones

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Shell-Ears and Tin-Ears (from ‘An Imaginary History of Musical Polynesia’, 2015)

19 Dec

 

Shell-Ears and Tin-Ears

(after ‘War Between Short-Eared and Long-Eared Tribes’, Easter Island)

The tin-eared people were the rulers and they inhabited the big skyscrapers, gated estates and apartment blocks in the most expensive suburbs and cities.

The shell-eared people lived on the poorest land in the small overlooked places, or in the cold shadows cast by the big buildings that belonged to the tin-eared people.

One day, the tin-eared people wanted to build another big skyscraper for themselves on shell-eared people’s land, so they put out a call:

“Come and help us clear these poor lands and make them better,” the tin-eared people said. “If you do this, the land will be improved and the shell-eared people can live there more comfortably.”

But the shell-eared people knew the tin-eared people’s tricks. They knew that the moment their lands were no longer poor they would be taken from them and they refused to do the work.

Then the tin-eared people cleared the land themselves and, angry at having to labour even for a day like shell-eared people do for all their lives, the tin-eared people now said they were building a big complex of luxury apartments for themselves on that land which belonged to the shell-eared people.

And the tin-eared people took the land from the shell-eared people, and built their big complex of luxury apartments there, and then they left them all empty, for the tin-eared people already had apartments and houses and could not live in them all.

While the tin-eared people were building the luxury apartments that no-one needed, they heard the shell-eared people singing and playing on musical instruments in their cramped huts while sitting around their fires, and before throwing them from the land, the tin-eared people said to each-other:

“These sounds will make lots of money for us if we can take them from the shell-ears and sell them to our own kind to play in their cars and offices.”

So before they drove the shell-eared people from their land and away from even the cold shadows of that empty luxury apartment block, they sneaked inside all the shell-eared people’s huts and took away their drums and guitars, their marimbas and flutes.

Only when the tin-eared people had done all this did they drive the bulldozers over the huts and pour the concrete over the places where those shell-eared people’s huts had once stood to erase all trace of them and make it appear they were never there, as they always did.

There was one woman who was very unusual in this story, for though she was born shell-eared she had married one of the tin-eared people in her youth. Now she was full of regrets, for she had found her husband could not respect her because she lacked a tin-ear.

But this same woman had also once been known among the shell-eared people as a great musician, so some of the business associates of her tin-eared husband came to her with all those stolen musical instruments and asked her to play them, as no tin-ear can ever be a true musician.

This woman now knew what the tin-eared people had done to the shell-eared people’s huts, but she played a short song on each of the instruments her husband and his associates handed to her anyway, hoping that the tin-ears she lived among would one day listen and hear something other than the sound of money rattling in every part of the world.

For the truth, as this woman knew to her heart’s cost, was that where shell-ears can hear music, tin-ears can hear nothing but the sound of money rattling in every part of the world, alive or inanimate.

When birds sing, shell-eared people hear the conflicts and courtships of wild nature or a promise of dawn, but tin-eared people hear only the money rattling in their feathers and meat or locked away inside all the timber of the trees those birds make their nests in.

When there is conversation, shell-eared people listen and hear the voices speaking and the words being said, but tin-eared people listen for nothing but the money rattling in a person’s business connections and appearance or locked away in their personal possessions and bank accounts.

When there is music playing, shell-eared people hear its sounds and textures, its harmonies and rhythms, its meanings and shifting atmospherics, but tin-eared people hear only the money rattling about in the infinite numbers of ways it can be wedged into slots on radio and TV or make terrible adverts for things not even other tin-eared people want 4% more effective with some demographics.

This was what this woman’s husband now proved, for hearing his wife play one beautiful song, he only heard money rattling in its slow and languid movements, thinking that it might be made simpler and more cheaply then sold to help other tin-eared people relax after they had spent their days listening for more things to get money rattling out of, which was indeed exhausting.

And hearing his wife play a song full of all the suggestive and snaking rhythms that no shell-eared person could possibly hear without remembering fleshy pleasures and dancing to it until they sweated and became delirious, the tin-eared husband could only hear the money rattling in the possibility of making a cheaper version and putting it on a keep-fit CD to sell at garages.

It is the way of this world that for tin-eared people, who can only ever hear money rattling in everything in this world, alive or inanimate, there is only one distinction that counts among all the sounds, the only subtlety a tin-ear can distinguish that a shell-ear will rarely notice.

For a tin-eared person, money rattles in different directions, so if a tin-ear hears money rattling into his tin, he is pleased and delighted, and he will congratulate himself endlessly. But if he hears money rattling out of his tin, he grows quickly resentful and his mood becomes dark and vicious.

Even so, after all this, or perhaps because of all this, the tin-eared people are still the rulers, and they still live in the biggest skyscrapers and office blocks of the most expensive cities, and the shell-eared people still live on the poorest land in the small and overlooked places, among all the cold shadows cast by the big buildings made for tin-eared people by other tin-eared people.

It is true that the shell-eared people still have drums and guitars, marimbas and flutes, and they are sometimes played, but even when silenced these sounds are suggested by all the noises of the world that made them and are still heard in that world by the shell-eared people, though their hearts might break at what the recognition of these noises conjures and stirs within their bodies.

Perhaps this war between the tin-eared people and the shell-eared people will continue indefinitely.

Or perhaps the shell-eared people will notice that they greatly outnumber the tin-eared people and turn on them, and after great bloodshed leave only one alive, as a reminder to themselves of the cost of inaction should the tin-eared ever again win the upper hand over the shell-eared.

Or perhaps, as that shell-eared woman married to a tin-eared husband hopes, the tin-eared people will learn to listen and hear again, for it is said that their ancestors once heard as the shell-eared people do, before this strange affliction that made them hear only money rattling in every part of this world, alive or inanimate, took them so far away from their own selves and senses that they came to consider any state other than their own an illness to be punished and cured.

Whatever comes next between the tin-eared people and the shell-eared people is not yet known, for the tale is now ended and my page falls silent as this world never will.

Buy Exotica Suite & Other Fictions (Shoestring Press, 2015)

 

Ten Poems About Nottingham (Candlestick Press, 2015)

20 Nov

Ten Poems about Nottingham (Candlestick Press)

‘The Second Time As Farce’, first published in March 2015 among the uncollected poems gathered in Black Glass: New & Selected Poems, has now taken its (arguably unlikely) place among pieces by Henry Kirke White, D.H. Lawrence, Joan Downar and others as one of the Ten Poems About Nottingham featured in the latest Candlestick Press ‘instead of a card’ anthology.

More details on the publication and its availability can be found on the Candlestick Press website.

 

Exotica Suite & Other Fictions (Launch at New Art Exchange, July 10, 2015)

20 Jun

Exotica Suite & Other Fictions will be out on July 10th, via Shoestring Press for the print publication, and as a full length album, also titled Exotica Suite, on CD from July and as a vinyl LP in 2016. The recordings feature some of the written texts sampled, remixed, re-edited and performed with music by Paul Isherwood, best known for four acclaimed albums made with The Soundcarriers, most recently Entropicalia (Ghost Box, 2014). The launch will also premiere a cycle of related short films to which the recordings act as soundtracks. It’s all scheduled to take place at at New Art Exchange on July 10, between 6 – 9pm, free but booking via Eventbrite is strongly recommended.

Exotica Suite & Other Fictions

BOOK PUBLICATION CONTENTS & BLURB:

Exotica Suite begins with an Easter Island creation chant in the style of William Blake’s Proverbs of Hell and an imaginary Polynesian colony in England in the 1780s then takes in a series of tall tales featuring Hawaiian musicians. Other Fictions fabricates occult histories in Nottingham caves and embarks on a labyrinthine sea voyage with the body of a late Hawaiian King. Now gathered in one place for the first time, the various forgeries, stories, false lectures, misleading anecdotes and other writings in Exotica Suite & Other Fictions are the flip-side to Black Glass: New & Selected Poems, also published by Shoestring.

Exotica Suite simultaneously exists as a vinyl LP and audio CD made in collaboration with the musician Paul Isherwood, best known for his work with The Soundcarriers.

“…spins a web that oscillates between the fictional and non fictional and encourages us to reflect on how we navigate the past and how this could affect all our futures.”

Katherine Wood on Marine (2013)

Book Contents:

Part One: Exotica Suite:
A Creation Fragment from Easter Island
An Account of the Hawaiian Colony in England (1790)
The Kumulipo Variations
Four Hula Songs for the Goddess Laka
The Sorceress
An Imaginary History of Musical Polynesia
(i) The First Musician
(ii) Joseph Kekuku Between Two Worlds
(iii) Sol Hoopii Finds A Sack Of Souls
(iv) Arthur Lyman’s Marimba Calms Pele’s Rage
(v) Shell-Ears And Tin-Ears
Invocation to Sun Ra (1914 – 1993)

Part Two: Other Fictions
Marine: A Story in Eight Objects
A Marriage of Styles
The Disappearances
The Peel Street Codex
The Nottingham Medlars
An Edible Alphabet
Fabricated Archives
Spirit Wrappings: Some Notes on the Rashleigh Jackson Family Collection
A Mandinka Song: Theme & Variations
Disturbances
The Enigma of Robert Holcombe
Convulsive Beauty: A Fabricated Lecture
Twelve Non-Specific Sites

The Sorceress (1955) Latino Graphics E

Exotica Suite LP/CD Tracklist:

Side 1:
The Hawaiian Colony Ballad I
Creation Fragment
Altar Prayer For Laka
A Hula for Laka (For Link Wray)
The Hawaiian Colony Ballad II
The Sorceress

Side 2:
Ankle Bracelet
Flute Interlude
Kumulipo Variation
The Hawaiian Colony Ballad III
Subliminal (Invocation to Sun Ra)

Black Glass: New & Selected Poems (Shoestring, 2015)

3 Apr

Black_Glass

Black Glass: New & Selected Poems (Shoestring Press, 2015)

ISBN: 978-1-910323-25-0

120 pages, paperback, 148x210mm

Wayne Burrows is a poet whose imaginative flair is matched by his readiness to experiment with a variety of forms and themes. Since the appearance of his first full collection, Marginalia, he has published sequences of free-standing poems, often in pamphlet form, and has worked with visual artists as well as on film projects. Black Glass brings together a substantial selection of previously published work and more recent, uncollected material.

Wayne Burrows was born in Derbyshire, grew up in Mid-Wales, then lived in Sheffield and East London, where he worked mainly as an editor and freelance journalist. Recent publications include Spirit Wrappings: Some Notes on the Rashleigh Jackson Family Collection (2012), Marine: A Story in Eight Objects (2013), The Holcombe Tarot (2014) and Exotica Suite (2015). He has also made several short collage films, including Disturbances (2010), The Serendipity Loops (2012) and Subliminal (2015), and created fictional retrospective exhibitions under the entirely fabricated identity of the British artist Robert Holcombe (b.1923 – d.2003).

Marginalia is a book about being in love in our increasingly weird world, transformed by the scientific view and the bombardments of the media. It’s exploring a new feeling of being human, registering the survival of love in spite of everything.” – Ambit

“The power of the genuinely surreal comes together here with a different kind of haunting (Dutch) painterly perspective.” – TLS

Marginalia is a considerable achievement.” – Poetry Wales

“Baroque manipulations of natural imagery set his work well apart from writing in the green affirmative mode.” –Poetry Review

Contents: Black Glass: New & Selected Poems (2015)

from Marginalia (2001)

Llanddwyn
After Englynion
Binary
A Recipe For Insanity
Stanzas for the Harp
Transference
Marginalia
The Bubble

from The Protein Songs (2005)

The Protein Songs
That Afternoon
Siesta Hour

from Emblems (2009)

A Trick of the Light
Slapstick (Coda)
The Archway Altarpiece
Side-Effects
Underground

from The Apple Sequence (2011)

The Apple Prologue
The Apple Migrations
The Roots Of The Apple
(i) East Malling, 1912
(ii) Herefordshire, 2011
Egremont Russet
James Grieve
Hidden Rose
Newton’s Wonder
The Apple’s Song In Autumn
Things That Are Not Apples
A Grubbed Orchard (Does Spring Come…?)
The Order of Seasons

Uncollected Poems (2006 – 2014)

Lines After Abbas Ibn Al-Ahnaf
The Blue Wolves and The Wheelbarrow
Black Glass
Zeropolis, or Shelley in Las Vegas
Instructions for Baking the Nottingham Golem
A Simultaneous Translation
The Second Time As Farce
Luigi Russolo
The Shadow
By Way Of Digression…
Mnemonic
Sonnets in the Aftermath and Anticipation of a Financial Meltdown
(i) Genesis
(ii) The Commandments
(iii) A Prayer
(iv) Revelation
On A Very Small Planet, Not Too Far Away

A Cycle of Songs from the Body’s Interior (2013)

Prologue: Panis et Circensis (Bread and Circuses)
(i) The Leukocytes
(ii) The History of the Red Cells
(iii) The Origin of the Heart Beat
(iv) Electrical Changes in the Heart
(v)Perfusion of the Excised Heart
(vi) The Circulation
(vii) Skin Sensations
(viii) The Lachrymal Apparatus
(ix) The Properties of Nerve
(x) Nerve Regeneration
(xi) The Peripheral Nerves
(xii) The Endocrine System
(xiii) The Semicircular Canals
(xiv) The Primary Organs of Sex
(xv) The Physiology of Reproduction
(xvi) Pregnancy and Parturition
(xvii) The Quadrants of the Breast
(xviii) The Deep Layers
(xix) The Arterial Pulse
(xx) The Cortical Structures
(xxi) Examination of the Tongue
(xxii) Supplementary Physical Signs
(xxiii) The Degeneration of Tissue
(xxiv) Disorders of the Heart
(xxv) The Coats of the Eye Ball